Technical

In pictures | Six innovative uses of constructional steelwork

CM looks at some inventive applications for structural steel, from a new wharf for the British Antarctic Survey to a state-of-the-art training ground for a Premier League football club

Powering ahead at Battersea

Phase two of the redevelopment of south London’s iconic former power station includes restoration of the original Grade II-listed building and the addition of shops, restaurants, offices and apartments. William Hare is installing some 24,000 tonnes of steelwork – connected into the existing structure in places – working with construction manager Mace. Photo supplied by New Steel Construction
Phase two of the redevelopment of south London’s iconic former power station includes restoration of the original Grade II-listed building and the addition of shops, restaurants, offices and apartments. William Hare is installing some 24,000 tonnes of steelwork – connected into the existing structure in places – working with construction manager Mace. Photo supplied by New Steel Construction

Steel erection in extreme conditions

The steel-framed wharf of the new Rothera Research Station in Antarctica was completed late last year. Four-Tees Engineers fabricated 1,000 tonnes of steel in the UK, before shipping it nearly 9,000 miles for assembly on one of the most inhospitable construction sites on earth. BAM Nuttall is main contractor for the British Antarctic Survey project. Photo supplied by New Steel Construction
The steel-framed wharf of the new Rothera Research Station in Antarctica was completed late last year. Four-Tees Engineers fabricated 1,000 tonnes of steel in the UK, before shipping it nearly 9,000 miles for assembly on one of the most inhospitable construction sites on earth. BAM Nuttall is main contractor for the British Antarctic Survey project. Photo supplied by New Steel Construction

Scoring with steel at Leicester

McLaren Construction recently completed one of the largest football training centres in the UK for Premier League club Leicester City. The signature building, with a steel-framed structure erected by fabricator BHC, houses a full-size football pitch. Some 1,700 tonnes of steelwork were used for the project. Photo credit: Plumb Images
McLaren Construction recently completed one of the largest football training centres in the UK for Premier League club Leicester City. The signature building, with a steel-framed structure erected by fabricator BHC, houses a full-size football pitch. Some 1,700 tonnes of steelwork were used for the project. Photo credit: Plumb Images. Photo supplied by New Steel Construction

First-class delivery at Lord’s

Part of Marylebone Cricket Club’s ongoing masterplan to redevelop the historic Lord’s Cricket Ground, two steel-framed stands are currently under construction. The new Compton and Edrich stands are both three-tier structures which will accommodate 11,600 spectators. Severfield is providing 2,300 tonnes of steel, working with main contractor ISG. Photo supplied by New Steel Construction
Part of Marylebone Cricket Club’s ongoing masterplan to redevelop the historic Lord’s Cricket Ground, two steel-framed stands are currently under construction. The new Compton and Edrich stands are both three-tier structures which will accommodate 11,600 spectators. Severfield is providing 2,300 tonnes of steel, working with main contractor ISG. Photo supplied by New Steel Construction

Steel’s tight squeeze in Hackney

The Britannia Leisure Centre and adjoining City of London Academy are being delivered by Morgan Sindall on a tight site in Hackney. An efficient structural design has maximised space on the limited footprint bordering Shoreditch Park, with some 2,200 tonnes of steelwork erected for both buildings by fabricator Severfield. Photo supplied by New Steel Construction
The Britannia Leisure Centre and adjoining City of London Academy are being delivered by Morgan Sindall on a tight site in Hackney. An efficient structural design has maximised space on the limited footprint bordering Shoreditch Park, with some 2,200 tonnes of steelwork erected for both buildings by fabricator Severfield. Photo supplied by New Steel Construction

Super spans at distribution hub

A major distribution centre for retailer Co-op in Biggleswade, Bedfordshire, features a steel portal structural design with spans of 36m and a maximum height of 15m. Caunton Engineering, working with main contractor Winvic, erected 2.5 tonnes of steel for the 61,409 sq m facility, while separate recycling and maintenance buildings have 28m-wide and 26m-wide spans respectively. Photo supplied by New Steel Construction
A major distribution centre for retailer Co-op in Biggleswade, Bedfordshire, features a steel portal structural design with spans of 36m and a maximum height of 15m. Caunton Engineering, working with main contractor Winvic, erected 2.5 tonnes of steel for the 61,409 sq m facility, while separate recycling and maintenance buildings have 28m-wide and 26m-wide spans respectively. Photo supplied by New Steel Construction

All project details and photos supplied by New Steel Construction

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  1. Modular steel construction – the future of the industry!

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