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World’s tallest modular building completed

Ten Degrees Croydon (Image: HTA)

Construction of the world’s tallest modular building, the 135m-tall Ten Degrees Croydon in south London, has been completed.

The project, built by Tide Construction and Vision Modular Systems, and designed by architect HTA, consists of 546 homes in a pair of 38- and 44-storey towers.

The design and construction involved a variety of modern techniques, including the use of virtual reality and 3D printing for rapid prototyping at planning and an angled modular façade.

The entire project was delivered from first concept sketch to handover in 39 months, with the modular construction resulting in a claimed 40% reduction in embodied carbon compared to traditional construction methods.

The design draws on the local mid-century buildings including Richard Seifert’s No1 Croydon. Simon Bayliss, managing partner, HTA Design said: “Ten Degrees defines a new benchmark in the potential of modular construction to deliver more, better-designed homes, in buildings of the highest architectural quality with world-leading engineering.”

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Comments

  1. Wow, that ten degrees building has really got some architectural merit, or should I say has not!!!!!!! If that is the best they can do then god help the sky line. What has happened to architectural merit?
    HTA Design said: “Ten Degrees defines a new benchmark in the potential of modular construction to deliver more, better-designed homes, in buildings of the highest architectural quality with world-leading engineering.” They would say that wouldn’t they, trade descriptions??????

  2. “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder” as they say I suppose.

    What IS more important though, is that the industry is at last catching on to modular steel construction and all the benefits that come with it.

    More and more firms need to get involved with this modern method of construction and stop clinging to the past.

    The question is: What barriers are preventing companies from adopting this system and what can be done to make it easier for them to move forward?

    Any suggestions anyone?

  3. One would expect improved overall project duration utilizing modular construction. 39 months overall project duration does not attest to that. It would interesting to know how much of the 39 months did engineering and fabrication consume.

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